Departure Songs



"Hammock go massive as they meditate on grand themes of death and loss, their music ever larger, more expansive. Every song a mountaintop vista with a clear view to the horizon, unencumbered by clouds, in all directions. Hammock retains its simple approach to epic music-making, heralding their muse in all capital letters, with cinematic crescendos and an architect’s ear for structure both within a song and as a sequence of songs. Hammock’s greatest success as musicians is to make music that is, at its heart, completely the saddest music ever made but expressed in a manner that is ecstatic. Which is what makes Hammock special -- ecstasy through exquisite sadness. Epiphany." James Mason


"It was a rough year. Departure Songs became a way of unpacking and dealing with loss. We have a song/video from our Maybe album called 'Mono No Aware.' The simplest translation of this Japanese phrase means, 'The sadness of things.' I feel like Departure Songs is our expression of the experience of 'Mono No Aware.' I do think and feel that ultimately all of us are writing our own songs of departure just by living our lives. I guess the question is, 'What will it sound like when it’s all said and done?'

I think a better way to describe Departure Songs is that it’s our most 'accessible' record so far. We got tired of people saying that they either finish their homework or fall asleep while listening to our music. So we reacted and made a very conscious decision to make a record that, I guess is more engaging, for lack of a better word… The theme is very heavy but I agree the production is more in line with a traditional pop/rock approach. Our next record is a reaction to that approach. We have begun the mixing process in England already. We know that our records can have different approaches regarding production but there is always a signature sound that I think always comes through. I’ve always wanted to be in a band that has a signature sound." —Marc